Big city health and wealth SHTF prepare

The rich eat better. Piles of fruits vegetables spices herbs. Many rich look slender and healthy, run more, go to gyms, tennis, ski, active sports. Around here sick fat slobs eating fast food driving big fat vehicles.

Inflated people pay inflated prices for food.

Move to the big city to inflate your health and wallet. Herd instinct. Birds of a feather flock together. Peer reinforcement.

Get rich and healthy. Avoid debt. Good food. Fancy jobs. SHTF is coming.

http://nyti.ms/1KJ9q6D

NYTimes: Fairway Slumps as Epicure Options Grow

Fairway Market, the grocery chain known for offering exotic foods to affluent shoppers

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The original Fairway Market on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. The grocery now operates 15 stores.

In Fairway Market’s grocery store on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, shoppers bustle past a colorful array of squash, peppers and cucumbers.

A bulb of fennel or a bright red pomegranate can be picked up for $2.99.

The scents of ground fair-trade coffee, pricey imported French cheese and fresh-baked loaves of artisanal bread waft through the store.

Just around the corner, at Whole Foods, shoppers bustle past a colorful array of squash, peppers and cucumbers.

A bulb of fennel or a bright red pomegranate can be picked up for $2.99.

The scents of ground fair-trade coffee, pricey imported French cheese and fresh-baked loaves of artisanal bread waft through the store.

Fairway’s motto may be “Like No Other Market,” but these days, a lot of grocery stores are awfully similar. When Whole Foods opened on the Upper East Side earlier this year, Fairway said sales immediately slumped at its store there.

The New York supermarket wars are just one of Fairway’s problems. A leveraged buyout of the chain by aprivate equity firm has contributed to a heavy debt load of $250 million. An overambitious store-opening strategy — it vowed to open 300 stores across the country — drained its cash flow and has caused ratings agencies to downgrade its debt. Its stock has plummeted, declining 86 percent since it went public in 2013.

“Fairway has had some expectations issues, They have had some difficulties executing on their growth strategy.”

Fairway, which operates 15 stores in the New York metropolitan area. For decades, Fairway operated as a small family-owned business on the Upper West Side.

What started in 1933 as a fruit and vegetable stand run by Nathan Glickberg became a uniquely Manhattan shopping experience where food lovers and gourmands pushed and shoved their way through crowded, narrow aisles stacked high with goods, on the hunt for

baby octopus from India,

barrels of Gaeta olives or

wedges of Moliterno truffled cheese.

Sterling and Mr. Glickberg embarked on an ambitious expansion strategy. Soon, stores were opening in Paramus, N.J.; Stamford, Conn.; and, in 2011, the Upper East Side. Much of the growth was funded by debt. In the spring of 2013, Fairway took advantage of a hot market for initial public offerings and sold its story to Wall Street. Fairway was also trying to ride the same wave as competitors like Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods, which were rapidly opening new stores and targeting baby boomers and

affluent shoppers in urban and suburban communities with

farm-fresh organic produce,

cage-free eggs and specialty items like

pink Himalayan sea salt.

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