classes, health, family farm, Dr. Harvard, UCSF, Berkeley

Alan,

Heat wave finally, temps 100/70 for several days — busy days at the beaches and boats. Summer was too cool so only had an ok tourist season.

I drove a hard curvy 100 miles per day last week to attend some classes in Cybersecurity, Mathematics, and Medical Studies. Exhausting but amazing how a few basic lectures can help understanding. Much better than trying to read internet.

Students around here are almost all white, clean cut, well mannered, with grades and test scores above CSU, more like a mid-range UC. Sort of like what I would imagine colleges back in the 1950s. Traditional culture offers many advantages.

Traditional farming also has many advantages. The modern economy produces cheap foods but these lead to many new diseases that are expensive to treat. It is like 2 steps forward and 1 step backward. Maybe 2 or 3 steps backward.

I am trying to understand the basic biochemistry and develop the economic and financial implications. Looks like a bubble that will at some point burst — too many junk food diseases. A catastrophe that may cripple or terminate the economy. A worn down diseased population cannot fight off HIV-AIDS, Ebola, bird flu or other epidemic. Obama may declare martial law and become dictator for life.

USA focused on Negro riots and looting in Ferguson Missouri but ignored the Negro riots in dark Africa. Negroes broke into hospitals treating Ebola patients and stole everything, including bloody sheets and other contaminated items. If this epidemic cannot be stopped then the world is in big trouble. (Usually Ebola does not spread easily.)

People need to go back to family farms and growing more of their own food. Stuff in stores is terrible. The more I read about it the worse it looks. People could grow healthy food and get needed sunshine and exercise growing their own food. So they would be more resistant to Ebola and other diseases. They would also be more geographically separated so the disease cannot reach them so easily. Having a good source of water and electricity and heat can greatly aid survival.

This author makes many good points (many interviews online such as at peoplespharmacy.com)

http://drdaphne.com/books/farmacology/overview/

In Farmacology, Daphne Miller brings us beyond the simple concept of “food as medicine” and introduces us to the critical idea that it’s the farm where that food is grown that offers us the real medicine. Venturing out of her clinic and spending time on seven family farms, Miller uncovers all the aspects of farming—from seed choice to soil management—that have a direct and powerful impact on our health. Bridging the traditional divide between agriculture and medicine, Miller shares lessons learned from inspiring farmers and biomedical researchers and artfully weaves their insights and discoveries, along with stories from her patients, into the narrative. The result is a compelling new vision for sustainable healing and a treasure trove of farm-to-body lessons that have immense value in our daily lives.

http://www.amazon.com/Farmacology-Innovative-Family-Farming-Healing-ebook/dp/B0089LOISW

In Farmacology, practicing family physician and renowned nutrition explorer Daphne Miller brings us beyond the simple concept of “food as medicine” and introduces us to the critical idea that it’s the farm where that food is grown that offers us the real medicine.

By venturing out of her clinic and spending time on seven family farms, Miller uncovers all the aspects of farming—from seed choice to soil management—that have a direct and powerful impact on our health. Bridging the traditional divide between agriculture and medicine, Miller shares lessons learned from inspiring farmers and biomedical researchers and artfully weaves their insights and discoveries, along with stories from her patients, into the narrative. The result is a compelling new vision for sustainable healing and a treasure trove of farm-to-body lessons that have immense value in our daily lives.

In Farmacology you will meet:

a vegetable farmer in Washington State who shows us how the principles he uses to rejuvenate his soil apply just as well to our own bodies. Here we also discover the direct links between healthy soil and healthy humans.

a beef farmer in Missouri who shows how a holistic cattle-grazing method can grow resilient calves and resilient children.

an egg farmer in Arkansas who introduces us to the counter-intuitive idea that stress can keep us productive and healthy. We discover why the stressors associated with a pasture-based farming system are beneficial to animals and humans while the duress of factory farming can make us ill.

a vintner in Sonoma, California, who reveals the principles of Integrated Pest Management and helps us understand how this gentler approach to controlling unwanted bugs and weeds might be used to treat invasive cancers in humans.
a farmer in the Bronx who shows us how a network of gardens offers health benefits that extend far beyond the nutrient value of the fruits and vegetables grown in the raised beds. For example, did you know that urban farming can lower the incidence of alcoholism and crime?

finally, an aromatic herb farmer in Washington State who teaches us about the secret chemical messages we exchange with plants—messages that can affect our mood and even keep us looking youthful.

In each chapter, Farmacology reveals the surprising ways that the ecology of our body and the ecology of our farms are intimately linked. This is a paradigm-changing adventure that has huge implications for our personal health and the health of the planet.

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